Seven Steps To Negotiating Successfully

When you negotiate, do you use a system? Do you haphazardly jump into a negotiation without any planning or thought for what you might do if you hit roadblocks? In order to negotiate successfully, good negotiators prepare before a negotiation.

The information that follows outlines seven steps you can use to negotiate successfully.

1. Gather Background Information: When gathering background information, include the style, values, ethnicity, culture, demographics (younger negotiators on/using twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and their way of communicating, versus those that are slower to use these mediums) and other information that’s pertinent to that particular session.

2. Assess your arsenal of tactics and strategies: The more you’re aware of how to use the appropriate tactic with the appropriate strategy, applied at the appropriate time, the more options you’ll have and be able to execute during the negotiation.

3. Create Your Negotiation Plan: Consider the overall strategy you’ll use for the negotiation. Break strategies into tactics. Assess possible strategies the other negotiator might employ. Take into consideration the use of red herrings (Note: Red herrings are items that have little to no value to you that you position as having value, but items that possess real value to the other negotiator). Also consider how you might apply pressure to points (leverage) throughout the negotiation.

4. Engage in the Negotiation Process: Observe body language and mannerisms. This can be done in person, via the phone, and in writing (e-mail, etc.). Note the style in which the other person negotiates (i.e. friendly (let’s get along), reserved (I’m not quite sure how this is going to go and I’m apprehensive), hostile (I’ll show you mine, if you show me yours – the only way for me to win is for you to lose – I’m in the driver’s seat; it’s my way or the highway).

5. Closing the Negotiation: Be on high alert for the conclusion of what you think is an agreement, that serves as the opening of the next phase of the negotiation; in some cultures, this is a common practice. If you’re unsure of the other person’s sincerity, put deliverables into phases of the negotiation.

6. Conduct a Postmortem: Dissect the negotiation. Assess what went right – What could have been improved upon – What you learned from that person about negotiation styles – What lessons should be taken forth into other negotiations – What went wrong – Why did it go wrong – What could you have done differently – What prevented you from using a better tactic/strategy to allow you to gain control of the negotiation).

7. Create Negotiation Archive: Create an archive of your negotiations and store them in a repository. Set up keywords to cross-reference sections, tactics, and strategies in your negotiation write-ups, to be used for the extraction of quick ideas and serve as a resource, for future negotiations.

Whether you’re a negotiation neophyte or a seasoned professional, by using the platform of the “Seven Steps To Negotiating Successfully” as your negotiation foundation, you’ll be considerably ahead of the other negotiator… and everything will be right with the world. Remember, you’re always negotiating.

The Negotiation Tips Are…

• When negotiating, seek advantages that allow you to exploit your strength, but don’t disparage the other negotiator in your enthusiasm to obtain victory.

• When a negotiation outcome is less than expected, learn from the experience. Commit to getting better. Increase your knowledge of how to use the right tactic, with the right strategy(s), aligned with the right situation.

• Make sure you observe and control your biases when assessing the person with whom you’ll be negotiating.

How to Ensure Your Presentation is Perfectly Balanced

Balancing Your Presentations

I’m going to show my age here but do any of you remember the singer Val Doonican? He would always wear big cuddly jumpers and sit on a three legged stool with his guitar on his leg.

Now if I were sitting on his stool right now about to present, I would hope that the three legs are firm, secure and of the same length.

Otherwise the stool will collapse and I’ll bomb.

Now when you’re presenting, imagine that you have to sit on this stool for the entire session. I bet you hope that your stool is robust enough to carry you through. So let’s get this stool robust enough.

You see the three legs of the stool must be perfectly balanced otherwise the presentation will fail. Full stop.

Leg one is the objectives of your presentation, leg two is the time and leg three, your audience. Are they in balance is the question to ask yourself before every presentation.

Objectives
Onto leg number one – the objectives should be clear. You’ve probably heard of SMART objectives, which is a very useful acronym on how to structure any business objective but what I want you to do is to switch the focus. Away from you and to your audience, who are actually more important than you. It’s not what you want to achieve…it’s what the audience want to get out of listening to you talk.

My experience has shown that business presentation audiences want to do one of three things. As a result of listening to you, they want to:

  • Be able to do something, or
  • Understand something, or
  • Agree to do something.

Naturally your talk might want to help them do a few of these objectives but you do have to be very careful in not trying to achieve too much. The last objective, agree to do something, might only happen if an earlier understanding objective is achieved and it’s highly unlikely you’ll get the whole audience to commit to do something.

Audience
Leg number two is the audience. The audience is king, and should be put up there on the throne. How much time to you spend researching your audience:

  • Who they are?
  • Why are they attending?
  • What time of day is it going to be?
  • What knowledge do they already have?
  • What attitudes and beliefs do they have?
  • How many of them are there?
  • What’s their background

And so on. Really focus on your audience.

Time
And finally leg number three, time. How long do you have to talk? Seems quite simple really but this one can jeopardise the other legs quite quickly. One of the biggest mistakes presenters make (and myself included here) is to try and achieve more objectives than can be achieved in the time available. We end up rushing, trying to get our audience to take on more than the magic three points, lose our real purpose and often overrun, which is unforgivable.

Let me give you an example. If some one fixes the audience, the time and the objective, you’re usually on a hiding for nothing. Some years ago I was asked by a sales director to address his entire sales team on how to negotiate client fees effectively. The venue was a smart hotel and the event was their annual sales conference.

The audience numbered over 100 and the time I was allowed was 30 minutes, and that was assuming the person before me didn’t over-run (and they always do). Now this was impossible to achieve in 30 minutes and if I went ahead as requested I would have bombed. Instead, thankfully, we negotiated the objective and dumbed it right down. We also arranged for further workshops to address the remaining objectives with less than 12 people per workshop.

Next time you’re planning a business presentation, before you jump head first into PowerPoint, stop and think of your stool. Are the legs strong enough and in balance to support your presentation?

Think back to the singer Val Doonican, if any of his legs were shorter or a bit wobbly, poor old Val would have come a cropper right in the middle of his song. Now that would have been a great shame wouldn’t it?

The Key to Effective Public Speaking and Presentations

Speaking in front of crowds is a critical skill. It creates job security by making you an invaluable employee, it helps you gain respect and recognition from your peers and superiors, and at social gatherings the ability to give a moving speech allows people to see you in a shining light. The advice I am going to give you today will help you learn the art of giving an effective presentation or speech.

First: Write out your speech. Even if you don’t have the speech near you when your speak or have it memorized, having written it before will allow you to remember the main speaking points.
While popularized on television shows, an vintage path show is not necessarily a bunch of antiques hitting the road to provide folks a glimpse of history. In numerous instances the participants in the indicate may well be showing off their collections of antiques, but they’re also interested in getting and selling other antiques. While the old-fashioned street display that was broadcast on Public Broadcasting has traveled the country, offering men and women the opinions of expert appraisals of their possessions, not everyone is convinced the specialists are all that knowledgeable.

There’s no doubt that the benefit of an product is subjective, based on age, situation and usability. Nonetheless, every single appraiser, even those applied with such productions as the antique path present, are going to have a difference opinion as their knowledge in the specialized area may be diverse. The thing to recall about appraisals, is that they are what that one person’s opinion is of the product.

Similar to collectibles, the true benefit of an item is what an additional person is willing to spend for it, and there numerous diverse aspects that play into the equation. When visiting an antique street demonstrate, it can be crucial to bear in mind that a high appraisal by reflect the approximate value of an vintage, promoting it for that price tag may be challenging if you can find no buyers willing to pay out that amount.

Whilst it has often been said that beauty is inside eye from the beholder, with experiences of attendees of an old-fashioned street indicate, the benefit could be the eye on the potential buyer. Even if an item has received a low appraisal, if it will be the one piece that a collector needs to total a set from a particular era, they might be willing to pay out an exceptional price to total their collection.

With numerous items shown throughout an traditional street present, there might be someone looking at items made inside a factory that was operated by a family member generations in the past. Being able to purchase something that could have been produced by a great-great-grandparent will add sentimental benefit to the product, in spite of any appraisal offered at the traditional street demonstrate.

While many on the old-fashioned street present specialists are truly knowledgeable about particular kinds of antiques and can present a timeline of production, situation and approximate value, it is critical to recall that an product is only as worth the selling price that someone else may perhaps be prepared to pay out to own it.

Second: This tip is for when using a visual aid like a powerpoint. Put critical information on the slides. Do not put information that will help you remember what to speak about, put exactly the main point you are conveying is so that even if the audience misses a sentence or two they can still follow along.

Third: Dress to impress. This is important. Being well dressed gives you confidence and that confidence will exude to the audience and they will be more engaged.

Fourth: Before going to out to speak take a deep breath and think over the main points of your presentation. This relaxes you and gives you confidence. The audience can tell if you’re uptight or relaxed. If you’re relaxed they respond more receptively. Also, going over the main points before going in front of the crowd gives you confidence because you know what you are going to say.

Fifth: Once you begin your speech, move to the center of the stage then slowly as you continue speaking begin moving around the stage. Being in the center shows the audience your confidence and it engages them more so that they will be more receptive to what you say. As you move speak loud enough for everyone to hear and speak clearly and deliberately.

Sixth: As you conclude go back over the main ideas and summarize them. This way the main topics of the speech are fresh in the audience’s head and the presentation ends on a positive note.