Wireless Contract Negotiation – Understanding the Priorities of Wireless Contract Negotiation

Many organizations fall into the same trap when negotiating wireless contracts – listening to the wireless carriers. All wireless carriers know where the savings opportunities are, and most importantly they know what you’re spending. Negotiating the buckets of spending that your carriers offer will only end you with an ineffective contract.

There are a few guidelines you should follow when negotiating with your wireless carriers.

Know your spend. The most critical rule is knowing your spend. You wouldn’t go into a gunfight without ammo would you? You must understand how much you spend on voice and data plans, feature charges, minutes used, equipment purchases and replacements, etc. You will not get an acceptable contract without knowing your spend and where to focus.

Ignore volume percentage discounts. I’ve seen many companies focus on volume discounts, but it’s the absolutely wrong approach. I guess it’s a bragging right to tell all your procurement buddies, “I negotiated 25% from Carrier X.” I’d much rather take the initial 20% offered and focus on rate plan, features, equipment costs. The extra 5% would only equate to $50K annually for every million you spend.

Focus on service charges. Like the guideline above, focus on the service charges. After all, it makes up most of your wireless spend. Negotiating $10 off your rate plan costs would equate to an annual savings of $120k for every thousand users you have. Much more savings than focusing on the percentage discount.

Negotiate out of service level contract terms. The carriers will push for service level contract terms of one or two years. Negotiate out of this if at all possible. A service level contract term will complicate your wireless management, or you’ll be hit with early termination fees. If a line is under a two year service contract and that user leaves the company, cancelling the service early could result in a $200 termination fee. It’s much wiser to give back some of volume discount percentage to eliminate the early termination fee issue. If you can’t negotiate out of this clause, you’ll need to ensure you manage wireless numbers and reassign rather than cancel.

Fight for fixed equipment pricing. Like service line contracts, you don’t want to manage upgrade pricing. Many carriers will subsidize the first piece of equipment heavily but force you to pay extremely high costs if replacing within a year or two. Paying $500 for a Blackberry three times because you have an executive who keep dropping them off his yacht is not fun. Try to negotiate flat pricing for equipment. Don’t focus on specific models, as they always change, but on classes. Put the responsibility on your carrier to offer devices in the same class or higher at the negotiated rate.

Look for other benefits. Does your organization have other needs? Are you looking at Wi-Fi for your locations, bar code scanners at your warehouse, Fixed Mobile Convergence? Work with your carriers to provide these services as part of your contract. It’s extremely difficult to get capital approval in today’s environment. Let your carriers fund your projects. Wireless carriers are happy to provide these added services as it carries over into more usage and more users. As long as it’s related to wireless, your carriers can help.

Speed is a strategy. How long have you seen wireless contract negotiations take? Six, eight, ten months or longer? What value comes out of these long negotiations? I’ve seen organizations in a year long contract cycle and only achieve 10% greater savings than the offers exchanged in the first 2 months of the contract.

To clarify my point, let’s assume the initial contracts offered the potential for $500k in annual savings. The additional savings over a three year contract (at 10%) would equate to $150k.

  • Initial Contracts Savings Potential Annually = $500,000
  • Monthly Savings Potential – rounded = $ 42,000
  • 10 Month’s of Savings Lost = $ 420,000

In this scenario, the organization lost $420k in savings to achieve an additional $150k. Now, you could argue that the organization will still get the $420k, it’s just pushed out farther. This is true, but when you factor in the amount of time and man-hours invested into the longer contract cycle the $150k in extra savings erodes pretty quickly. In any event, I’d rather start getting $42k in savings now and move on to the next opportunity.

The specific approach to a wireless contract negotiation varies based on your organization’s specific needs, but these guidelines will help you focus on the true savings opportunities.

The Key to Effective Public Speaking and Presentations

Speaking in front of crowds is a critical skill. It creates job security by making you an invaluable employee, it helps you gain respect and recognition from your peers and superiors, and at social gatherings the ability to give a moving speech allows people to see you in a shining light. The advice I am going to give you today will help you learn the art of giving an effective presentation or speech.

First: Write out your speech. Even if you don’t have the speech near you when your speak or have it memorized, having written it before will allow you to remember the main speaking points.
While popularized on television shows, an vintage path show is not necessarily a bunch of antiques hitting the road to provide folks a glimpse of history. In numerous instances the participants in the indicate may well be showing off their collections of antiques, but they’re also interested in getting and selling other antiques. While the old-fashioned street display that was broadcast on Public Broadcasting has traveled the country, offering men and women the opinions of expert appraisals of their possessions, not everyone is convinced the specialists are all that knowledgeable.

There’s no doubt that the benefit of an product is subjective, based on age, situation and usability. Nonetheless, every single appraiser, even those applied with such productions as the antique path present, are going to have a difference opinion as their knowledge in the specialized area may be diverse. The thing to recall about appraisals, is that they are what that one person’s opinion is of the product.

Similar to collectibles, the true benefit of an item is what an additional person is willing to spend for it, and there numerous diverse aspects that play into the equation. When visiting an antique street demonstrate, it can be crucial to bear in mind that a high appraisal by reflect the approximate value of an vintage, promoting it for that price tag may be challenging if you can find no buyers willing to pay out that amount.

Whilst it has often been said that beauty is inside eye from the beholder, with experiences of attendees of an old-fashioned street indicate, the benefit could be the eye on the potential buyer. Even if an item has received a low appraisal, if it will be the one piece that a collector needs to total a set from a particular era, they might be willing to pay out an exceptional price to total their collection.

With numerous items shown throughout an traditional street present, there might be someone looking at items made inside a factory that was operated by a family member generations in the past. Being able to purchase something that could have been produced by a great-great-grandparent will add sentimental benefit to the product, in spite of any appraisal offered at the traditional street demonstrate.

While many on the old-fashioned street present specialists are truly knowledgeable about particular kinds of antiques and can present a timeline of production, situation and approximate value, it is critical to recall that an product is only as worth the selling price that someone else may perhaps be prepared to pay out to own it.

Second: This tip is for when using a visual aid like a powerpoint. Put critical information on the slides. Do not put information that will help you remember what to speak about, put exactly the main point you are conveying is so that even if the audience misses a sentence or two they can still follow along.

Third: Dress to impress. This is important. Being well dressed gives you confidence and that confidence will exude to the audience and they will be more engaged.

Fourth: Before going to out to speak take a deep breath and think over the main points of your presentation. This relaxes you and gives you confidence. The audience can tell if you’re uptight or relaxed. If you’re relaxed they respond more receptively. Also, going over the main points before going in front of the crowd gives you confidence because you know what you are going to say.

Fifth: Once you begin your speech, move to the center of the stage then slowly as you continue speaking begin moving around the stage. Being in the center shows the audience your confidence and it engages them more so that they will be more receptive to what you say. As you move speak loud enough for everyone to hear and speak clearly and deliberately.

Sixth: As you conclude go back over the main ideas and summarize them. This way the main topics of the speech are fresh in the audience’s head and the presentation ends on a positive note.

Negotiating the Best Price on an REO Foreclosure

Negotiations can be one of the most thrilling aspects for buyers of any piece of real estate. Since the average member of the buying public doesn’t get that many chances to hone their haggling skills in everyday life, they often relish the opportunity to do so when it comes to their home purchase. With regards to bank-owned foreclosures, buyers who are in the know enjoy optimal negotiation positioning, resulting in fantastic deals.

Real estate negotiations begin with the context of the potential transaction. That is to say, without a full understanding of the home, the market, and the circumstances surrounding both, buyers are flying blind. The word “buyers market” has been thrown around quite a bit over the last few years, which implies that all of the leverage is on the side of the buyers. While this is largely true in many transactions, it is by no means universal. Even today, in some cases buyers find themselves in a bidding war, at the mercy of the whims of their counterparts just like a few years back. The key is to understand what is being offered, and what one hopes to achieve as a buyer.

This is a critical element of any successful negotiation/purchase strategy that is overlooked far too often. One must not confuse the feeling of “coming out on top” with getting a good deal in actual terms. Many buyers would feel better after paying $5,000 less for a home that is overvalued by $10,000 than they would by paying $5,000 more for a home that is undervalued by $10,000. By separating perceived savings from observed savings, buyers free themselves up to unearth fantastic savings in their real estate purchases, especially when it comes to REO properties.

When negotiating for a bank-owned foreclosure property, understanding the home’s list price and where it falls within the value range is a necessary first step, given how REO properties are valued in the first place. To say the very least, foreclosure property valuation is an inexact science. The Asset Manager (entity in charge of handling the foreclosure transaction on behalf of the bank) collects a series of agent-generated evaluations of a home, and makes a value determination based on these findings. Many of these evaluations are “exterior-only” meaning the agent merely drives by the home, snaps a few photos of the exterior, and are then tasked with determining the home’s value. Even when performing interior evaluations, agents must generate market values for properties while taking into consideration amenities, useful life of upgrades, and repair costs for damages. The asset manager, which more-often-than-not is located in another state altogether, then dictates the list value for a property they’ve only seen in photos.

The result is that from time-to-time bank-owned foreclosure properties are listed on the market at values that aren’t in sync with the area value range. Often times, listings that come on the market way under value are met with a storm of offers, some of which may even be over asking price. So as a bargain-hunter, should a competitive offer situation be seen as an indicator that no savings are to be had? No way! The key is to understand that a bargain isn’t defined as sale price vs. list price, it is sale price vs. market value.

When developing a pricing strategy for an offer, agents are full of stupid ideas. Some advise offering some arbitrary percentage under the list price if their clients have the only offer on the table, while others suggest offering some arbitrary amount extra over list value for every competing offer that has been submitted. For starters, one must make their own determination of a home’s market value, irrelevant of the list price. From there, buyers must determine how much of a savings they would feel satisfied with getting, vs. how much savings they would be willing to give up to get the home. If buyers fall in love with a home and will do anything to get it, then negotiating for maximum savings may not be the best strategy, especially in a competitive situation. Sometimes deal-seeking buyers get overzealous in a competitive situation, and offer enough as to eliminate all potential savings, or even go over market value altogether. A good negotiator knows that they must be able to make their own determination of value, and they must not let emotions govern their approach.

Speaking of emotions, they have clouded countless real estate deals over time, especially when the sellers have a personal interest in the home. When buying a bank-owned foreclosure, however, buyers can be as sassy as they want with their negotiation tactics without fear of hurting anybody’s feelings. The banks are financially invested, but not emotionally invested. Telling the banks that as a buyer you think a home is worth a lesser amount is fine, and is not taken as a personal affront. Yet if not done properly, it won’t lead to any positive outcomes either.

Lending institutions and asset managers rely on market data when determining a list price, and are open to relying on the same when deciding whether or not to accept an offer. If an offer is made that is under list price but is backed up with market data indicating that the price is justifiable in the market area given local value progression, buyer demand, economy, etc., then the banks are much more likely to play ball. The best way to steer things towards a positive result when negotiating with the banks is to speak their language.

Price is the primary factor that drives negotiations, but is not the only variable in the equation. Buyers can sweeten offers in a variety of ways, some of which come at no additional cost. For example, a buyer who has been fully vetted by their lender and has their inspectors on standby can tighten all of their contingency time frames, offering a faster, more attractive closing. If a buyer isn’t entirely happy with the present condition of the home, they may be able to negotiate for repair credits, something that is not generally known about buying bank-owned property. Credits are preferred by banks to performing repairs themselves, which often involves more red tape than they would like. By forming the other elements of an offer as per the specifications of the lending institution on the other end of the deal, one can add appeal to a deal that can sufficiently offset a lower offer price.

Given the market conditions across the country, there is an abundance of great deals on REO properties out there for the taking. Whether the goal is paying bottom dollar, or getting the home that is desired above all others, the path to success is essentially the same. By properly defining true value for any home, and formulating an offer strategy that is attractive to the banks and asset managers in all of the most important ways, buyers can achieve any goal when negotiating their next home purchase.