PowerPoint Presentation Success – 5 Tips For Successful Presenters

Preparing your next PowerPoint presentation doesn’t have to be difficult. Yes, it’s true that the medium has its problems. But you can solve most of these problems by being more selective with the many choices that PowerPoint provides. Make choices that suit you and don’t be pushed into standard or inappropriate layouts. So when you are ready to prepare your next PowerPoint presentation here are five essential tips:

  1. Typeface and font. Choose a typeface that your audience can read on your presentation screen. Experiment with a serif typeface such as Times New Roman and sans-serif typefaces such as Arial and Verdana (Format: Replace Font). You want your words to be readable by your audience — so aim to use a font with a point size that is fully legible; 16 point or 18 point perhaps (Format: Font).
  2. Colors. Your choice of typeface color is also important (Format: Font: Color). Some colors will be less visible to your audience than others. Greens and reds can be indistinct on a white background. Blues and blacks have more visibility. Don’t forget to consider your background color scheme (Format: Background).
  3. Bullet Points. It’s the bullet point list that creates most problems for your audience. There are either too many bullet points, too many words per bullet or just too many lists in a presentation. They work best when you want to summarize or signpost direction. This is what we’ve done. This is where we are going.
  4. Images and video. Aim to use images as effective visual metaphors in your presentation (Insert: Picture). They will enhance and support your speech. Make sure that your pictures are big enough to fill the screen. Use video and audio files in your PowerPoint presentation when you have the opportunity (Insert: Movies and Sounds). It’s an ideal way to build interest and keep your audience engaged.
  5. Charts and graphs are key to many presentations (Insert: Chart). Remember to keep the charts big, without too much distracting detail. Don’t mix them with bullet points. It weakens their impact. Try to use the “build” technique (Slide Show: Custom Animation). Your chart can build itself as you speak — based on rehearsed timings or your mouse click. Very effective. Remember the point, turn and talk technique for PowerPoint charts. Point at the screen, turn to your audience and then make your point.

PowerPoint provides you with some exciting tools for your presentation to be truly successful. Visual and multimedia effects can be stunning with PowerPoint — helping you to make that all important audience engagement. Just beware the traps presented by too many palette choices and the standard text layouts.

Salary Negotiation Tactics – 6 Practical Tips

I firmly believe no matter what the circumstance is for your initial job offer, you should negotiate for more (as long as you do it right)! It does not matter whether the economy is booming or not, once you get a job offer – negotiate.

Just two months ago, a friend got an 20% increase in his contractor rate after he negotiated. In this case, his client low-balled him as many would do during the recession because it’s an employer’s market. Many people are so thankful that they were offered anything that they forget to ask for a fair compensation. It’s still smart and okay to negotiate even in a tough market.

Here are four salary negotiation tactics that have worked for me and my clients over and over again. There are also two tips on what not to do during salary negotiation. Being tactful is key.

Four salary negotiation tactics

  1. Be creative with what you negotiate. Your compensation is much more than just salary. There is also signing bonus, performance bonus, moving expenses, car stipend (if you have to drive far for work), 401K matching, title, vacation time, or pay grade. For example, even if the company can’t pay you a good salary now because of caps set in place due to the economy, if you have a higher pay grade setting, then your future salary and increase could be higher.
  2. Be specific and reasonable - tell the company what you actually want (a 10% increase, a guaranteed 5% bonus based on performance, a VP title, etc…) and make sure it’s not ridiculous. I was hiring someone who actually asked for 30% more in her salary when I know she was already getting a 15% increase from her last salary. We almost rescinded her offer.
  3. Tell them at least one and preferable two plausible reasons why you are negotiating for more. It’s no good and could even be offensive if you just said you want more money and can’t say why. Some good reasons are:
    1. you have a better offer (whether you want to bluff about this is up to you as just like Poker, there is a chance they won’t call you on it);
    2. your market rate is higher (meaning the average paying rate right now for this level is X% higher than your offer);
    3. your current offer is a big step down from past compensation;
    4. sometimes the sympathy card could even work and say “I have a new baby and I am just trying to make sure I can get by and 10% more could really help!” You would be surprised at what you can leave on the table if you don’t ask.
  4. Express your enthusiasm to work for the company when negotiating. No employers wants to give you more unless they know that you are almost certain to take it if they agreed. Also, it doesn’t hurt to convey that you have very good reasons (other than compensation) why you want to work for the company.

Two things to avoid during salary negotiation

  1. Don’t ever give an ultimatum – or anything that could be construed as an ultimatum. Salary negotiation is an art form and takes practice. Don’t ever back yourself into a corner because you most likely still want to take the job if they said no.
  2. Don’t be arrogant or an a__ when negotiating: Remember the person you are negotiating with is mostly likely your future boss or someone who can influence your future boss’ opinion of you. This salary negotiation should be a good experience for both sides

More people have been surprised at what they can get when they used the right salary negotiation tactics. It doesn’t hurt to ask if you do it right. With that said, there is no guarantee anything will change with your offer. If the company declines your proposal, be sure to thank them for their consideration and make your decision on whether to join based on existing offer. Either way, you would have gained more experience on how to approach negotiation in the future. We will change jobs many times in our careers. The experience you gain in mastering these salary negotiation tactics will pay off again and again in the future.

Good luck out there! I am always in your corner

- Lei

The Key to Effective Public Speaking and Presentations

Speaking in front of crowds is a critical skill. It creates job security by making you an invaluable employee, it helps you gain respect and recognition from your peers and superiors, and at social gatherings the ability to give a moving speech allows people to see you in a shining light. The advice I am going to give you today will help you learn the art of giving an effective presentation or speech.

First: Write out your speech. Even if you don’t have the speech near you when your speak or have it memorized, having written it before will allow you to remember the main speaking points.
While popularized on television shows, an vintage path show is not necessarily a bunch of antiques hitting the road to provide folks a glimpse of history. In numerous instances the participants in the indicate may well be showing off their collections of antiques, but they’re also interested in getting and selling other antiques. While the old-fashioned street display that was broadcast on Public Broadcasting has traveled the country, offering men and women the opinions of expert appraisals of their possessions, not everyone is convinced the specialists are all that knowledgeable.

There’s no doubt that the benefit of an product is subjective, based on age, situation and usability. Nonetheless, every single appraiser, even those applied with such productions as the antique path present, are going to have a difference opinion as their knowledge in the specialized area may be diverse. The thing to recall about appraisals, is that they are what that one person’s opinion is of the product.

Similar to collectibles, the true benefit of an item is what an additional person is willing to spend for it, and there numerous diverse aspects that play into the equation. When visiting an antique street demonstrate, it can be crucial to bear in mind that a high appraisal by reflect the approximate value of an vintage, promoting it for that price tag may be challenging if you can find no buyers willing to pay out that amount.

Whilst it has often been said that beauty is inside eye from the beholder, with experiences of attendees of an old-fashioned street indicate, the benefit could be the eye on the potential buyer. Even if an item has received a low appraisal, if it will be the one piece that a collector needs to total a set from a particular era, they might be willing to pay out an exceptional price to total their collection.

With numerous items shown throughout an traditional street present, there might be someone looking at items made inside a factory that was operated by a family member generations in the past. Being able to purchase something that could have been produced by a great-great-grandparent will add sentimental benefit to the product, in spite of any appraisal offered at the traditional street demonstrate.

While many on the old-fashioned street present specialists are truly knowledgeable about particular kinds of antiques and can present a timeline of production, situation and approximate value, it is critical to recall that an product is only as worth the selling price that someone else may perhaps be prepared to pay out to own it.

Second: This tip is for when using a visual aid like a powerpoint. Put critical information on the slides. Do not put information that will help you remember what to speak about, put exactly the main point you are conveying is so that even if the audience misses a sentence or two they can still follow along.

Third: Dress to impress. This is important. Being well dressed gives you confidence and that confidence will exude to the audience and they will be more engaged.

Fourth: Before going to out to speak take a deep breath and think over the main points of your presentation. This relaxes you and gives you confidence. The audience can tell if you’re uptight or relaxed. If you’re relaxed they respond more receptively. Also, going over the main points before going in front of the crowd gives you confidence because you know what you are going to say.

Fifth: Once you begin your speech, move to the center of the stage then slowly as you continue speaking begin moving around the stage. Being in the center shows the audience your confidence and it engages them more so that they will be more receptive to what you say. As you move speak loud enough for everyone to hear and speak clearly and deliberately.

Sixth: As you conclude go back over the main ideas and summarize them. This way the main topics of the speech are fresh in the audience’s head and the presentation ends on a positive note.